MATH Marine Anthropology Modules

Nov 19
The Posts on this page are the summaries for the courses developed by Marine Archaeologist Yvonne-Cher Skye while living aboard the Mary and Bill of Rights in Chula Vista, California, U.S.A.. It consists of 21 aspects of Marine Anthropology which can be taught in a seminar single-day format or over an 18-week semester. The supplemental materials will be available for purchase via paypal or credit card on her webpage located at the YGFI- Your Girl Friday International Website.  Links to individual modules and their introductions will be posted on this page, as well as on the Skye Research Page on YGFI's website. To gain a better understanding of the courses that are offered, please read the introduction page here. Follow the links to the other posts which will provide links to the specific page on the website to purchase that module.  At the present time, they are provided as an entire package, which includes:
  • Course Outline
  • Glossary
  • Module
  • Notes
  • References available
  • Websites
  • Summary of course to promote to students and the public
  • Handouts
  • Video list of related topics
As well as each document is available for single purchase. The purpose of these modules is to provide an unique educational opportunity which does not require formal educational training to conduct the course.  The idea of providing so many supplemental materials is to ensure satisfaction of the attendees of the course, as well as the boards or governing bodies of any organization that chooses to add these courses to their existing programs.  As stated in the introduction module this is only the skeleton of the courses, and it can stand alone as an introductory course, further more advanced courses will be developed in the future. Ms. Skye has also developed modules for Climatology, Marine Science, and soon to be announced. MATH 001 In the Beginning - Summary MATH 002 Fabled Lands - Summary MATH 003 Legendary Voyages - Summary MATH 004 Sea Quests, Famous Expeditions and Explorers - Summary MATH 005 Maritime History - Summary MATH 006 Nautical Custom - Summary MATH 007 Life at Sea - Summary MATH 008 Famous Captains - Summary MATH 009 Mutinies - Summary MATH 010 Big Ships - Summary MATH 011 Death and Disaster - Summary MATH 012 Navigable Waters - Summary MATH 013 Castaways and Survivors - Summary MATH 014 Criminals - Summary MATH 015 Myths - Summary MATH 016 Mysteries - Summary MATH 017 Monsters - Summary MATH 018 Wraiths of the Sea - Summary MATH 019 Superstitions and Beliefs - Summary MATH 020 Famous Ships - Summary MATH 021 Battles - Summary
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Traverse Board

Feb 23
Posted by leafworks Filed in Navigation and Measure

091712-052

Traverse board:
http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=265

"Traverse board: The ship's crew used a traverse board to plot the ship's speed and course over four hours, which was the length of time of one watch shift. The speed and compass direction were plotted on the board at thirty-minute intervals. At the end of the watch, the information plotted on the traverse board was charted on paper. The information helped pilots with estimating the ship's location" ~ Diorama/display in the Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida. (Photo 091712-52.jpg) Traverse board: http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=265.

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Maritime Navigation:

Feb 23
Posted by leafworks Filed in Life on the Sea, Navigation and Measure

091712-052

Navigation:
http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=271

" Navigation: Ship pilots of the 1500s had few tools to help them navigate unfamiliar waters. Pilots had to be familiar with astronomy, maps, math, physics, and seamanship to direct the ship successfully. Shifting winds and currents, and sometimes hurricanes made navigation difficult.

The Cross Staff: was used to measure the angle between the horizon and the sun or North Star. Combining this information with data from astronomical tables provided the latitude.

The Hourglass: A sand clock or hourglass was used to measure time. It took thirty minutes for the sand to empty from the upper to the lower chamber. The clock was turned upside down to repeat the process." ~ Diorama/display in the Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida. (Photo 091712-53.jpg) Navigation: http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=271.

091712-053

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binnacle

Dec 31
Posted by leafworks Filed in Parts of the Ship

THE BINNACLE:

The binnacle, usually near the steering wheel, is a shelf/cabinet used to hold the compass, lanterns, and half-hour glass. It is also usually a waist high case or stand on the deck of the ship, mounted in front of the captain or helmsman, upon or within which navigational instruments are placed for quick and easy reference. Early binnacles were made of timber and nails, but were found later to have caused magnetic deviations in compass readings. This was fixed by John Gray of Liverpool in 1854 by incorporating adjustable correcting magnets on screws or rack and pinions.

Aboard the Quarter Deck of the HMB Endeavour, which is architecturally based over the original drawings of the HMS Endeavour, near the steering Wheel is the binnacle. This would also have been located near the hutch on the original HMS that would have been where the poultry would have been kept in front of the wheel.

This article is by Thomas Baurley, volunteer tour guide of the HMB Endeavour while in port at Brisbane, Australia, and crew member during the 2011-2012 circumnavigation of Australia - for the Brisbane to Gladstone leg of the journey (April-May 2011).

For more Information About The Living History Museum on board the replica of the HMS Endeavour -
The HMB Endeavour, while docked in port at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.


The Wheel or Helm, & capstan, HMB Endeavour
Eagle Pier, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Bibliography/Recommended Reading:

  • Australian National Maritime Museum
    2011: Guide Handbook. ( Issued during HMB Endeavour Around Australia 2011-2012: Voyage of a Lifetime ). ANMM: Sydney, Australia.
  • Macarthur, Antonia
    1998: "His Majesty's Bark Endeavour: The Story of the ship and her people". Angus & Robertson/ Harper Collins; ANMM: Sydney, Australia. ISBN: 0207191808.
  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
    2011 Website Referenced: ~ "Captain Cook", "HMB Endeavour", "HMS Endeavour", "binnacle". en.wikipedia.org.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Articles and Research papers are done at the Author's expense. If you donate below, you'll help contribute to the costs of the research that provided this article. Any Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer's base location at time of request).

These articles are done by the writer at no payment. If you enjoy this article and want to see more, why not buy our writer a drink or meal to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this research?

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tiller

Dec 31
Posted by leafworks Filed in Parts of the Ship

THE TILLER:

The tiller is a heavy timber beam that is attached to the stern post and rudder. It is connected to the wheel by tackles and rope. It is a lever attached to the rudder post or stock and is classic to tall sailing ships. It is used by the captain or helmsman by directly pulling or pushing it, but can be moved remotely via the tiller lines. Rapid or excessive movement will cause increased drag and will brake or slow the boat. When used for steering, its always moved in the direction opposite of which the bow of the boat is to move. So if the tiller is moved to port side (left), the bow will turn to starboard (right). If tiller is moved to starboard, the bow will turn port. Sailing students use the phrase "Tiller Towards Trouble" to help them remember.

On top of the Quarter Deck or stern area of the HMB Endeavour, which is architecturally based over the original drawings of the HMS Endeavour near the Wheel or "helm" which is manned by two crew men at all times - one on each side of it. This "wheel" is connected to the tiller by ropes run around the wooden drum up and through a set of blocks. On the HMB, there is a "kick-up" on the tiller that allows it to pass over the chimney from the Great Cabin's stove. The capstan is a winch that has a vertical axis used to hoist heavy spars, yards, and utilized in maneuvering the ship while at anchor. Ten bars would be inserted and pushed in by crew and on the original HMS be solely worked by the crew's manual labor. Today on the HMB this is still done during rigging work.

For more Information About The Living History Museum on board the replica of the HMS Endeavour -
The HMB Endeavour, while docked in port at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Bibliography/Recommended Reading:

  • Australian National Maritime Museum
    2011: Guide Handbook. ( Issued during HMB Endeavour Around Australia 2011-2012: Voyage of a Lifetime ). ANMM: Sydney, Australia.
  • Macarthur, Antonia
    1998: "His Majesty's Bark Endeavour: The Story of the ship and her people". Angus & Robertson/ Harper Collins; ANMM: Sydney, Australia. ISBN: 0207191808.
  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
    2011 Website Referenced: ~ "Captain Cook", "HMB Endeavour", "HMS Endeavour", "Tiller". en.wikipedia.org.


The Wheel or Helm, & Tiller, HMB Endeavour
Eagle Pier, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Articles and Research papers are done at the Author's expense. If you donate below, you'll help contribute to the costs of the research that provided this article. Any Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer's base location at time of request).

These articles are done by the writer at no payment. If you enjoy this article and want to see more, why not buy our writer a drink or meal to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this research?

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Wheel or Helm

Dec 31
Posted by leafworks Filed in Parts of the Ship


The Wheel or Helm, & Tiller, HMB Endeavour
Eagle Pier, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

THE WHEEL OR HELM:

Atop the "Quarter Deck", usually just on the edge of the ship's waist and stern of the ship is the "helm" or the "wheel" of the ship, used for steering and navigation. This is home to the Wheel or "helm" which on tall sailing ships, is manned by two sailors at all times - one on each side of it. The stern and around the helm was also restricted to the Captain and officers. Any other crew would have to ask permission to be at the stern. From this vantage point, the officer would have a great view of the decks, sails, and crew. This "wheel" is connected to the tiller by ropes run around the wooden drum up and through a set of blocks. In combination of the rudder, tiller, and wheel - the ship would be steered. This combination would move the rudder that actually steers the ship. The sweep of the tiller and the ropes made the quarter deck difficult to walk across. Sometimes a "whipstaff" was used instead of a tiller, and this was a vertical stick acting on a tiller. Earlier sailing ships operated to correspond to the motion of the tiller, with a clockwise motion, turning the rudder and thus the ship to the left. The control direction of the wheel was reversed later after the 17th century to make it more consistent with the operations of a motor vehicle's steering wheel.

Modern ships used the steering wheel in the same regard, to adjust the angle of the boat or ship's rudder to force the vessel to change its course. Modern wheels are connected to a mechanical, hydraulic, or electric system and sometimes rather than using a wheel would have a toggle that remotely controls a electro-mechanical drive for the rudder.

Atop the Upper or Main Deck of the HMS Endeavour, is the ship's helm or wheel. This is towards the stern of the ship (rear). The wheel is connected to the tiller by ropes run around a wooden drum up and through a set of blocks. On the HMB, there is a "kick-up" on the tiller that allows it to pass over the chimney from the Great Cabin's stove. Near to the wheel would be the hutch on the original HMS that would have been where the poultry would have been kept in front of the wheel. Also near the wheel would be the binnacle which would house the compass, lanterns, and half-hour glass.

For more Information About The Living History Museum on board the replica of the HMS Endeavour -
The HMB Endeavour, while docked in port at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Bibliography/Recommended Reading:

  • Australian National Maritime Museum
    2011: Guide Handbook. ( Issued during HMB Endeavour Around Australia 2011-2012: Voyage of a Lifetime ). ANMM: Sydney, Australia.
  • Macarthur, Antonia
    1998: "His Majesty's Bark Endeavour: The Story of the ship and her people". Angus & Robertson/ Harper Collins; ANMM: Sydney, Australia. ISBN: 0207191808.
  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
    2011 Website Referenced: ~ "Captain Cook", "HMB Endeavour", "HMS Endeavour", "Helm", "Steering wheel". en.wikipedia.org.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Articles and Research papers are done at the Author's expense. If you donate below, you'll help contribute to the costs of the research that provided this article. Any Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer's base location at time of request).

These articles are done by the writer at no payment. If you enjoy this article and want to see more, why not buy our writer a drink or meal to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this research?

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sweeps

Dec 31
Posted by leafworks Filed in Parts of the Ship

SWEEPS:

Another term for "sweeps" are "large oars". These are used by ships to implement water born propulsion. They have a flat blade at one end, usually all made of wood. Oarsmen or crew would grasp the oars at one end and used to row or steer the ship. They were commonplace in ancient vessels.

Along The Upper or Main Deck of the HMB Endeavour, the replica of the HMS Endeavour are some sweeps. These are stowed in the Waist of the ship on the upper deck. For the HMB, these were recreated based off of crew artist Sydney Parkinson drawings. The original HMS would have had sweeps (large oars) for emergency maneuvers.

For more Information About The Living History Museum on board the replica of the HMS Endeavour -
The HMB Endeavour, while docked in port at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Bibliography/Recommended Reading:

  • Australian National Maritime Museum
    2011: Guide Handbook. ( Issued during HMB Endeavour Around Australia 2011-2012: Voyage of a Lifetime ). ANMM: Sydney, Australia.
  • Macarthur, Antonia
    1998: "His Majesty's Bark Endeavour: The Story of the ship and her people". Angus & Robertson/ Harper Collins; ANMM: Sydney, Australia. ISBN: 0207191808.
  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
    2011 Website Referenced: ~ "Captain Cook", "HMB Endeavour", "HMS Endeavour", "Joseph Banks", "Solander". en.wikipedia.org.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Articles and Research papers are done at the Author's expense. If you donate below, you'll help contribute to the costs of the research that provided this article. Any Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer's base location at time of request).

These articles are done by the writer at no payment. If you enjoy this article and want to see more, why not buy our writer a drink or meal to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this research?

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